The Empress Maria Theresa

Maria Theresa, (born May 13, 1717, Vienna—died Nov. 29, 1780, tasod4Vienna), archduchess of Austria and queen of Hungary and Bohemia (1740–80), wife and empress of the Holy Roman emperor Francis I (reigned 1745–65), and mother of the Holy Roman emperor Joseph II (reigned 1765–90). Upon her accession, the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–48) erupted, challenging her inheritance of the Habsburg lands. This contest with Prussia was followed by two more, the Seven Years’ War (1756–63) and the War of the Bavarian Succession (1778–79), which further checked Austrian power.

Maria Teresa had big blue eyes, blond hair, a slight blush to the Goths, a wide mouth and a strong body; Moreover, thanks to the fact that parents do not have close family ties, Maria Teresa did not suffer the harmful effects of marriages between close blood relatives who had characterized many of his aAndreas_Moeller_-_Erzherzogin_Maria_Theresia_-_Kunsthistorisches_Museumncestors.

Temperamentally, Maria Theresa was extremely serious and reserved; He loved to sing, archery and wanted to learn at least the basics of riding, but his father, fearing it could hurt, prevented it; also he participated in opera productions, often conducted directly by the Emperor Charles VI.

His education was supervised by the Jesuits who, although were able to teach her a good Latin, they were unable to correct his spelling and punctuation unconventional nor transmitted the eloquence of his predecessors to the point that the same Maria Teresa became used to talk and writing in Viennese dialect. The father, who still awaited male heir, not instructed on the affairs of state nor gave to his daughter preparing a heir to the throne, although allowed to sit on the board since he was fourteen years for this reason, in fact, , Maria Teresa, like the younger sister, received only notions of drawing, painting, music and dance disciplines for a typical role of a princess or a queen consort.

Maria Theresa thus became a pawn on Europe’s political chessboard. In 1736 she married Francis Stephen of 220px-Prince_François_Étienne_of_Lorraine_by_GobertLorraine. Because of French objections to the union of Lorraine with the Habsburg lands, Francis Stephen had to exchange his ancestral duchy for the right of succession to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. The marriage was a love match, and 16 children were born to the couple, of whom 10 survived to adulthood.

In Austria, the Empress Maria Theresa was much loved by the people, and they tell many funny episodes about her. On one occasion he spank a naughty boy who climbed on scaffolding so reckless, risk breaking his neck. That boy later became the great composer Franz Joseph Haydn, and had occasion to recall that episode to the Empress, who was pleased with herself for having perhaps saved the life of a musician like him. On another occasion, already elderly, she interrupted a performance at the Burgtheater in rushing imperial stage to announce to the audience, speaking in Viennese dialect, the birth of a grandson (son of the Grand Duke of Tuscany P.Leopold).

Despite being greased, Maria Teresa was in excellent health, and even in winter he always kept the windows open. He ran personally to close them when he was to receive his minister Kaunitz, who instead was a patch hypochondriac and was always complaining of a thousand ills. The Empress was famous because she was seen in public, in a carriage, even a few hours after giving birth.

It is said that the Empress died on a sofa red morocco full of pillows.
Trying to reach the windows (always wide open) for rifrigerarsi of his room, he gets up from his chair, but he loses his balance and tumbles on the couch.
He will remain there until the time of death, fair and noble as only she could be, so that her son Joseph tries to help her get settled on the couch and says “Are you comfortable..?” and she says “..to die? Too!” ..her last words.

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